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How Netflix's Osmosis Reflects the Potential Future AI Dating in Everyday Life

How Netflix's Osmosis Reflects the Potential Future AI Dating in Everyday Life

When encountering  the new French Netflix series Osmosis, I honestly thought it was a complete knock-off of Black Mirror. Osmosis delves into the creation of a new technology that helps people connect with their soulmates.  In addition, the series’ trailer includes ominous and deep questions of humanity similar to Black Mirror. The first two episodes that are always pivotal in determining the scope of a show are less about the downfalls of new technology, but more about the dangers of love, insecurity. Osmosis isn’t focused on breaking news headlines; it’s focused on conveying the stories of these emotions in people.

The main characters Paul and Esther are the brother-and-sister duo behind the latest technology called Osmosis. Osmosis places nanorobots in said person’s brain, and  the robots read  the inner thoughts and emotions. With this, the robots cross-reference them with many types of social media to find the perfect soulmate or twin flame. Osmosis is in the initial trial , and the first two episodes follow the people in the first trial as they get acquainted with their scientifically discovered love interests.

Paul deals with the business front of Osmosis and  ruthlessly promotes the technology. In this poeticism of the business, he kind of sounds like he’s in an actual meeting about what this technology could mean on a global scale: This technology will change everything! It’ll alter what it means to be human!

via  engadget

But Osmosis’ actual theme leans more to the idea that they don’t fit exactly into Paul’s algorithm. Paul may believe that the technology to find a soulmate will change humanity forever, but his sister disagrees. Esther, who is the technological brain behind Osmosis, is apathetic when it comes to romance. When she wants to have sex, she goes into a virtual reality simulation. She explains to Paul that  she already has two soulmates who take up all her time — Paul himself and their hospitalized mother. Quite honestly,  Esther hopes to use  Osmosis technology to revive her mother’s vegetative state, ( and three years earlier, she revived Paul, from a similar situation).

Esther is not the only person who doesn’t want to find love in someone else. Ana, a fellow test subject , is introduced as a fat girl who desperately seeks love. This is an insulting stereotype — except she’s more interested in politics and participating in the study to satisfy  her own agenda.

People are multifaceted beings and are not to be defined by a single narrative, despite directly feeding it to consciousness. So, with a  familiar romance plot, viewers have the ability perceive the show into something more suited for their needs, as well as the characters themselves.

This degree of  awareness makes Osmosis’ portrayal of technology refreshing, pointing to the idea that we don’t always have to have the same story. We have the opportunities to change the present and future  channels of our lives one step at a time.

Cover image via The Verge

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